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Asda: Sexist or PC gone mad?

I read the article in the observer yesterday citing the 160 + complaints that the Asda ad had generated from the public so far.

Really? Is this because people are genuinely distressed by the ad that is portraying such a horrific picture of Mum and Dad in their traditional roles in the lead up to Xmas? Or is this because media is attracting attention to it and people are jumping on another bandwagon.

The ASA are certainly taking it seriously – positioning a direct reference to it on their homepage.

Making a complaint about Asda?
The ASA has received a significant number of complaints about a TV ad for Asda. The ad features a busy mum doing lots of tasks in preparation for Christmas and on Christmas day and ends with a voiceover that states “Behind every great Christmas there’s mum and behind mum there’s Asda”. Members of the public have objected that the ad is offensive because they believe it reinforces outdated stereotypes of men and women in the home.

But really. Seriously? I didn’t watch it outraged. I watched it thinking “looks about right” based on xmas growing up, and xmas in my household now. Yes – Dad does more but Dad is actually in 2 scenes. It’s not like he’s slobbed out on the sofa the whole time watching TV and waving at Mum, he’s simply not the star of the ad. It’s simply paying homage to the fact that Mum, in the majority of households as far as Asda’s target market is concerned (as, let’s all remember they are trying to sell something to us not just entertain us for 45 seconds), plays a big part in the big day. Yes it’s not saying thanks to Dad in this one but, with 80% of Asda’s customers being Mums doing the household shop the job of the agency is to surely appeal to the majority and, I’m sure it’s hard to argue with an insight that was likely to be “Mum’s are a vital part of the lead up to xmas”.

As with anything, I’m sure there could be a cleverer way of doing it (cue John Lewis) but from the pocket slapping retailer is it really that bad?

Mums Net and Fathers4Justice obviously agree (they’ve held their grudge since Asda’s Mumdex) but, for everyone else, can’t we just accept an ad for what it is without turning it into a moral crusade. We know there are households without Mum’s, we know there are households that dont celebrate xmas, we know there are households where Mum is a lazy f*** and Dad does all the work. Actually perhaps the solution is to edit the ad with that as an end frame – just in case the public don’t “get” that it was simply advertising.

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